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Author: Subject: 21Century Doors Interview(recent)
dreamtime
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[*] posted on 3-11-2003 at 11:01 AM
21Century Doors Interview(recent)


Hi there people! It's me Sacredhigh from Cultnet!

Hope all is well with you all Culties! ;)

Well, here is a recent interview from the guys! Enjoy it! :angel:

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FROM VENICE MAGAZINE/ February 2003


by jose martinez

photography pamela littky

Approaching a heavy set of double doors at SIR Studios in Hollywood where the reunited and revamped Doors are rehearsing, the familiar sound of “Peace Frog” can be heard. The signature guitar riff of Robby Krieger and wailing organ style of Ray Manzarek are unmistakable. Once inside the small rehearsal space Cult lead singer Ian Astbury is singing at the top of his lungs about “blood on the streets.”

Ladies and gentlemen, from Hollywood, California, The Doors. Yes, they’re back. More than a second-rate reunion band, the new Doors are a force to be reckoned with.

The Hollywood Reporter called the band’s recent concert at the California Speedway in Fontana in celebration of Harley Davidson’s 100th anniversary, the band’s first show in 30 years, “pure shiver-up-the-spine magic.”

Currently on tour, The Doors (for the 21st Century as Manzarek likes to call them) find themselves in the interesting position of playing without the charismatic Jim Morrison, Mr. Mojo Rising himself, whose iconic personality often overshadowed the band.

“People say, ‘Don’t fuck with the magic,’ Krieger says of the new lineup. “But the gig worked out so well that we decided to see if we could keep it together.”

“The [new] music is different from the Doors, but decidedly Doors-like,” Manzarek adds. “We’re going in various directions musically.”

Heavily influenced by Morrison, singer Ian Astbury notes that The Cult “is on ice right now. This means more to me probably than singing on my first record deal. The Doors made me want to play music. I want it to succeed and take this music to where it should be.”

While performing a blistering version of “Wild Child,” Astbury asks at the end of the song, just like Morrison used to, “Remember when we were in Africa?” To which he immediately replies, “No.”

Gone is the Lizard King, but the Doors, also joined by former Police drummer Stewart Copeland who is filling in for John Densmore who suffers from tinnitus, sound as vital and vibrant as ever. Planning to record a new album for release this year, the surviving members and Astbury are writing with poet Jim Carroll, and X’s John Doe.

After witnessing a powerful hour of classic rock n’ roll firsthand, Krieger, Manzarek and Astbury talked about the new Doors for the 21st Century, the ramifications of reuniting, and the parallels between the sixties and the tumultuous days we’re living in now.



Venice: Did you ever think that the Doors would play and tour together again?

Robby Krieger: It was in the back of our minds.

Ray Manzarek: Especially after we did VH1’s “Storytellers” when we worked with a bunch of different lead signers. Ian was one of the singers on that show and just did a great job. It was like, ‘Boy, we ought to do this.’ And people would ask us, ‘When are you guys going to play?’ Well, unfortunately, John [Densmore] has tinnitus, and that show is what really brought it on so he’s unable to be with us. And then we had an offer from Harley Davidson to play at their 100th year anniversary here in Los Angeles so Robby called me and said, “Let’s do it.” Then we got Stewart Copeland to play drums.



I’ve heard you mention the 21st century a lot. What do you think the music of the Doors has to offer a new generation of music fans?

Ian Astbury: I think the Doors are responsible for a new generation of music fans in a lot of ways. Not only are the Doors very important musically but also they’re important spiritually, as well. Their body of work, I think, has influenced so many musicians. As far as I know, besides The Beatles, they’re the most influential band of all time. And I know a lot of young bands say they’re an influence because of their studio technique, lyrical content, and musicianship. The Doors were truly authentic in their day and they’re still authentic now with their body of work. I think a lot of what’s out now is not authentic.



A lot of what is popular now is either stripped down or retro; this is the original. Do you think kids can put their minds around that?

RM: I think so if they like passion.

RK: And music seems to be void of passion today…

IA: And depth. Everything is very superficial, and once you go deeper, there’s very little out there.



Did you ever think of going with a list of all-star singers for the new album?

RM: No, it’s a band called The Doors, The 21st Century Doors, retooled for the 21st century. And it’s a band and we intend to be a band. It’s not the Doors all-star show and revue, we’ll save that for the tribute bands.

IA: I think that would have trivialized the music as well. I’m speaking selfishly, but it’s not as easy as a lot of people would think to get up and play these songs and sing. Singing is the hardest part. There are few singers today. There are a lot of stylists and rappers but in terms of singing bar tones and having a sensibility of the blues, and also the depth of the music, and having an appreciation for it as well, there’s so much more to it.

RM: But we want to stay a band to explore the psyches of each member of the band, what each member of the band can bring spiritually and creatively to this energy called Doors music.



What was it about Ian that made you say this is the guy? Some critics have derailed him over the years calling him a Jim wannabe.

RM: All artists expose themselves when they open up their hearts, and the public and the critics are free to stab them in the heart or embrace them, whatever they happen to choose. But Ian has that shamanistic sense that comes from the same place that Morrison came from and that’s what’s fun about working with him. He’s not doing a Jim Morrison imitation. He’s not trying to ape Morrison. He’s just doing Doors songs as Ian Astbury. And whatever shamanic spirit he has is what we’re all tapping into.

RK: He has the ability to open himself up to Jim’s spirit and let that come through. I’m amazed at how well he does that.

IA: So am I. [laughs] I didn’t know I could do that.



What does playing with the Doors mean to you?

IA: It’s so exciting. When was the last time that there really was an unprecedented musical event? I think for serious music fans, the idea of hearing the Doors’ body of work performed by original members was an impossibility, and now it’s happening. What’s very important about this now, in some ways the Morrison mythology overshadowed his body of work, and I think the musicianship here is unbelievable.



What was the Harley Davidson concert like for you?

RM: You’re loaded with energy. Your job is to go out there and communicate spirit-to-spirit, heart chakra to heart chakra with the audience. We were just charged. I couldn’t wait to get out there and do it. I wanted to sit down at the keyboards and manipulate the sounds and be one with the energy. That’s the whole point of it for me. There was such a circle of energy going and going and going. The announcer said, ‘Ladies and gentleman, from Los Angeles, California, The Doors…’ and Robby started that signature lick of his [from “Roadhouse Blues”] and people just stood up, hands up in the air and stayed that way for two hours.



What was that moment like for you, Ian?

IA: I was really nervous. I was aware of the sense of responsibility to get it right and leading up to that show there was so much going on. I was getting dissed on web sites, called a third rate Jim Morrison, and in my heart there was no way…I revere Jim Morrison. I wasn’t trying to emulate him; that would be disrespectful to Ray and Robby and Jim and the audience as well. I think I’m getting over that now, there’s a healthy respect for Jim Morrison but I think the fact is that we’re getting on with it. There are so many kids that are Doors fans that never had the opportunity to see The Doors, myself included.



A lot people have this perception of a Doors’ concert as a riotous show led by an out-of- control Jim Morrison. How much pressure is there to go out there and just do a rock concert?

RM: Well, we’re not here to start a riot.

RK: If the audience wants to riot…

IA: Let’s start a riot…

RM: That’s how it always was. The sixties were a riotous time.

RK: In those days, the kids had never gone to rock concerts so they didn’t know what to do. There was this energy there. We’d leave the stage, there would be no applause and five minutes later they would destroy the place. They didn’t know what to do. Today, people are expert concertgoers.

RM: There’s no reason to riot.



Do you ever get lost in the moment and expect to see Jim onstage when you’re playing?

RM: No, Jim’s in heaven and he’s resting comfortably in the energy of the sun. His spirit is with us but not onstage. When you’re playing music the whole point of it is not to think about the past, not to think about the future, but to immerse yourself in the zen-present. That’s where you have to be to really make music. And that’s what we’re trying to bring to the new generation of kids. Hopefully we can bring that immersion into the present, living your life as if this is the greatest moment of your life. This is it. This is your life right here, right now. Revel in it. Because the parallels between the sixties and where we are now, the beginning of the 21st century with the war thing that’s going on now and the destruction of the environment, that’s exactly what we were fighting in the sixties. And interestingly, here come the Doors again. Hey, “Save the environment. Make love and not war.” That’s what we used to say in the sixties and boy, is that necessary today. Right now, the only people with the courage to manipulate reality are the fascists; they’re manipulating reality. What we want to do is say to everyone, we can manipulate reality too. All of us together, the lovers, not the killers. That’s the battle for the 21st century. We need to take control and dance madly around the Dionysian bonfire. Lots of good, good fucking, that’s what I advocate. •







[Edited on 3-11-2003 by dreamtime]

[Edited on 3-11-2003 by dreamtime]
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thumbup.gif posted on 3-11-2003 at 04:33 PM


Thank you, dreamtime! Great interview! ;)

and I was Jacitata... :D
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[*] posted on 3-22-2003 at 02:40 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by dreamtime
IA: I was really nervous. I was aware of the sense of responsibility to get it right and leading up to that show there was so much going on. I was getting dissed on web sites, called a third rate Jim Morrison, and in my heart there was no way…I revere Jim Morrison. I wasn’t trying to emulate him; that would be disrespectful to Ray and Robby and Jim and the audience as well. I think I’m getting over that now, there’s a healthy respect for Jim Morrison but I think the fact is that we’re getting on with it. There are so many kids that are Doors fans that never had the opportunity to see The Doors, myself included.




thanx...but...um...just who's this KID you're talking about IAN...you is an OLD man...just like me!! :lol:




From Velvet night came forth our torch burns eternal,
For time is but a dream and our mischeif be infernal,
Black Angels watch over neglecting the living but not the undead,
Blessed are the hallowed and gracious for their blood shall keep us fed,
Hark the electric thunder drawn like moths to a flame,
To a place of wicked wonder...and Hollywood be thy name.
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