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moya
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[*] posted on 4-4-2003 at 09:01 AM
found this


thought i shared...

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1445115/20010712/story.jhtml




*** All the suffering in the world arises out of wanting happiness for self. All happiness in the world arises out of wanting happiness for others ***
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doggiestar
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cool.gif posted on 4-4-2003 at 09:09 AM
i guess i shouldn't...but what the hell!!


:o

NEW YORK — As the Cult prepared to take the stage at Roseland Ballroom for their 2001 reunion tour, a tape playing the transcendent frog-like croaks of singing Tibetan monks wafted through the club, and meditative splashes of light were projected on a screen in front of the stage. It was the only peaceful moment of the night.

While the Cult's frontman Ian Astbury is indeed a practicing Buddhist, this was no place for preaching, and when the silhouettes of guitarists Billy Duffy and Mike Dimkich appeared against the screen as the two started chugging out the opening locomotive riff of "Rise," it became clear that the only higher power that would be called to was the God of Rock. As the screen dropped to the ground and the band launched into its kinetic music, the ritual began and the crowd, which included Gene Simmons of Kiss and Scott Ian of Anthrax, surrendered to the band.

The Cult's continued appeal — a full seven years after they originally packed it in — lies in their ability to generate primal rapture through simple beats, histrionic vocals, textural guitar washes and lots of blaring volume. And when they get the recipe right, as they did for most of the set, their songs take on a spiritual vibe even without Astbury's sometimes metaphysical lyrics. During the set, the Cult played most of their old hits and a good chunk of material from their new and heaviest record, Beyond Good and Evil. The songs blended elements of metal, hard rock, pop and goth, and refreshingly, the group avoided many of the standard clichés that tend to turn '80s rockers into parodies. Astbury entered wearing a dorky farmer's hat while Dimkich donned a cowboy hat; and Duffy, sporting short, spiky hair, looked like a Billy Idol impersonator minus the petulant sneer.

The band's second song was the somewhat obscure "In the Clouds," from the box set Rare Cult, but from there, the Cult powered through some of their classics in fine form. Astbury alternately banged a tambourine against his leg, kicked the air, thrust his arms in front of his body and danced a strange jig, all the while singing powerful passages that quivered with vibrato. Duffy's guitars cut through drummer Matt Sorum's hefty beats AC/DC-style during "Peace Dog," shimmered through on "Rain" and built from incandescent to combustive on "Fire Woman." During the ballad "Edie (Ciao Baby)," drummer Matt Sorum rolled his mallets on a giant gong that hung behind his kit.

Throughout the set the Cult slid new songs between their greatest hits, and while the crowd was mostly there to reminisce over their old faves, they warmly greeted the new material. "Breathe" featured a slithery Led Zeppelin riff, a harsh staccato rhythm and a drum'n'bass midsection. "The Saint" reverberated with a blend of glistening guitar and Metallica bravado. And "Take the Power" clanged and ground with angry, near-industrial intensity.

Are the Cult still a mighty arena rock band? Well, they sure act like it, even if they no longer have the popularity to play stadiums. Yet Astbury seems to lack the overblown ego and condescension of many mega rock stars (thanks possibly to his Buddhist beliefs). "I'm here merely to serve you. We are your servants this evening," he said before "She Sells Sanctuary," the last song of the regular set.

"It's really overwhelming, honestly," he continued humbly when the Cult came back for their encore. The band ripped into the opening track from its new record, "War (The Process)," which rumbled with Billy Morrison's deep basslines and a surging guitar rhythm. During Duffy's crackling guitar solo, Astbury dropped to one knee and spat a mouthful of water high into the air. He incoherently praised punk rock and criticized old-timers like Mick Jagger, then shouted, "Are you ready for 'Love Removal Machine'?" Needless to say, the crowd was, and as the Cult performed the final bars of the track, Astbury dove into the audience, having proven once again that hard rockers weaned in the '80s needn't sound dated or appear washed-up.




:flame: ON!!




From Velvet night came forth our torch burns eternal,
For time is but a dream and our mischeif be infernal,
Black Angels watch over neglecting the living but not the undead,
Blessed are the hallowed and gracious for their blood shall keep us fed,
Hark the electric thunder drawn like moths to a flame,
To a place of wicked wonder...and Hollywood be thy name.
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Cultpjfan
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[*] posted on 4-5-2003 at 12:56 PM


That's the shit.
Right there.
This band needs to rise again.




Fuck it all and fucking no regrets I hit the lights on these dark sets.


MetallicA St.Anger
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doggiestar
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cool.gif posted on 4-6-2003 at 05:39 AM
There Ya Go


Quote:
Originally posted by Cultpjfan
That's the shit.
Right there.
This band needs to rise again.



sacry thing is...it's from MTV!!! :o

:flame:ON!!!




From Velvet night came forth our torch burns eternal,
For time is but a dream and our mischeif be infernal,
Black Angels watch over neglecting the living but not the undead,
Blessed are the hallowed and gracious for their blood shall keep us fed,
Hark the electric thunder drawn like moths to a flame,
To a place of wicked wonder...and Hollywood be thy name.
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